Doodad Kind of Town


A Little Film Clip for a Sunday
August 24, 2008, 12:09 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Over the last three days, I’ve been enjoying a sort of movie “binge” that has included watching Catherine Breillat’s “The Last Mistress,” Mathieu Amalric’s brilliant performance in “Kings and Queen,” Gary Cooper and Patricia Neal in “The Fountainhead” and Gene Kelly and Cyd Charise in “It’s Always Fair Weather.”

But my favorite two minutes in the entire “binge” were these from “Way out West.” I could watch this over and over and over. Enjoy!

Advertisements

11 Comments so far
Leave a comment

I love The Way West. Were you watching Turner Classic Movies? They’re doing Summer Under the Stars all August with a different “star” each day; yesterday it was Laurel and Hardy’s big day. I recorded a whole host of films, shorts and features.

Comment by Alexander Coleman

Alexander-Yes,I certainly was watching TCM last night. I do love me some Laurel and Hardy. When I was a little girl, I used to watch their movies on TV with my Dad. I recorder a few other shorts, too.

Comment by Pat

Man, I love Gary Cooper in The Fountainhead. You’re the second person to bring that movie to my attention this weekend. I think that is a sign that I should revisit it.Also, what did you think of The Last Mistress? It played in my town for a week and it was gone… I didn’t get a chance to see it.

Comment by Fox

Fox -Yeah, Coop was great (I especially love that scene where he first lays eyes on Patricia Neal), but how over-the-top is this movie? I loved the modernist effects of the cinematography and the lighting – and Gary Cooper. But that screenplay, yikes!!! All that speechifying, all those characters that aren’t really characters, but just mouthpieces for Ayn Rand’s philosophy. Apparently, Rand wouldn’t let them release the movie if they altered so much as a word of her screenplay. I think King Vidor shaped into an interesting, entertaining film – but how much better could it have if Rand had been able to take a little constructive criticism. (But then, I guess that would have gone against the whole premise, right?)As for “The Last Mistress,” Asia Argento was amazing, but overall it didn’t do that much for me. It was my first Catherine Breillat film, though – I’ve got “Fat Girl” near the top my Netflix queue. If you have IFC Theatres On Demand through your cable or satellite provided, you can see it there.

Comment by Pat

Fox -Yeah, Coop was great (I especially love that scene where he first lays eyes on Patricia Neal), but how over-the-top is this movie? I loved the modernist effects of the cinematography and the lighting – and Gary Cooper. But that screenplay, yikes!!! All that speechifying, all those characters that aren’t really characters, but just mouthpieces for Ayn Rand’s philosophy. Apparently, Rand wouldn’t let them release the movie if they altered so much as a word of her screenplay. I think King Vidor shaped into an interesting, entertaining film – but how much better could it have if Rand had been able to take a little constructive criticism. (But then, I guess that would have gone against the whole premise, right?)As for “The Last Mistress,” Asia Argento was amazing, but overall it didn’t do that much for me. It was my first Catherine Breillat film, though – I’ve got “Fat Girl” near the top my Netflix queue. If you have IFC Theatres On Demand through your cable or satellite provided, you can see it there.

Comment by Pat

That’s a sweet story abuot you and your Dad, Pat.And you’re right about The Fountainhead. I remember seeing it when I was a little kid with my Dad, and enjoying it (despite not quite understanding all of the sexual subtext and all of that at around age four, about 19 years ago). Revisiting it about a year ago after having not seen it for many years, I found the “philosophical points” made by Rand’s characters to be painfully on-the-nose, bluntly hammered into the viewer with minimum grace and subtlety. Vidor did indeed make an interesting film out of it, but yeesh, that screenplay sure needed some work. Oh well.

Comment by Alexander Coleman

Lovely clip, Pat. I watched Laurel and Hardy as a kid with my father as well. It brings back memories.

Comment by Rick Olson

Boy, we really don’t have those comedic pairs anymore, do we?

Comment by Daniel G.

Alexander – The ‘sexual subtext’ of “The Fountainhead” was pretty bold. That last scene, with Neal ascending the REALLY BIG skyscraper and Cooper grinning proudly on top – I mean, talk about your phallic symbols!Rick – Seems like Laurel and Hardy movies were more easily accessbible when we were kids. I wonder if today’s kids even know who they are.Daniel – They sure don’t make ’em like Laurel and Hardy anymore. And really, there are no comic duos left (or triads, for that matter, e.g. the Marx Brothers, the Stooges) whose personalities and relationship to each other is so well established that you know exactly what you’re going to get the minute they show up – only the setting and the plot change. (Unless you count certain characters in SNL sketches.)

Comment by Pat

Never seen any of their pictures. I do have a L&H box set though that I still have to tear through.PS. You've been tagged by me.http://cinemafist.blogspot.com/2008/08/another-12-movies-meme-fest-o-rama.html

Comment by JOSEPH CAMPANELLA

Joseph -What's in your L&H box set? As for the meme – you're on! I expect this to be a bit of a challenge for me. There are a huge, whopping lot of movies I've never seen that I would love to see, but DVD availability is rarely the issue. It's just that I haven't gotten around to getting the DVDs!

Comment by Pat




Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s



%d bloggers like this: